Link

I wrote a post about the Hamlet quotes in Brave New World and how their original context adds depth to Huxley’s characters.

(Source: gleaming-arch.blogspot.com)

Photo
gameraboy:

It’s coming!

gameraboy:

It’s coming!

(via elegantdisco)

Photo
I have 700 lingots on Duolingo now, and I wish I could do something with them.  Sometimes I have to buy hearts, but those don’t cost all that much.

I have 700 lingots on Duolingo now, and I wish I could do something with them.  Sometimes I have to buy hearts, but those don’t cost all that much.

Link

I wrote a post about the lack of the Scourging of the Shire in The Return of the King (the movie).

(Source: illuminatedcelluloid.blogspot.com)

Photoset

(Source: arwenundomie, via liamdryden)

Text

In scheduling what books I’m going to start over the remainder of the year (and when), I realized that I’ll almost certainly have started 100 books by the end of December.  I’m positive that I won’t have them all finished by the time the year is over, but I’m currently at 61, so I sort of want to add more to see if I can read 100 books this year.  However, I’m already feeling sort of overwhelmed with how many I’m reading now (18), so I’m not going to make any definitive plans about it.

Text

I’ve been working through my Latin book again - although I’m going through it really slowly, so I haven’t gotten past the introduction yet - and in the part I read last night, the author talks about language families and changes in sounds.

It was really interesting, and it makes me want to study linguistics.  This is a thing I do every couple of weeks - I think that I should go back to university for sundry reasons (mostly because I don’t think I did it right the first time around).  And I even start looking up universities that have linguistics programs, but I’m always dissuaded by the prospect of having to live on campus because that’s what I hated so much.  Part of it was living in the same building with a bunch of loud and stupid people, but part of it is that a meal plan is included in the room and board, and - in my experience - those meal plans are vastly overestimated.  I don’t eat like a normal person in either amount or variety (I think I ate two different things in my university cafeteria and only ten times a week at maximum, where even the smallest meal plan was - I think - fifteen meals a week), so any meal plan is just not feasible.

Text

I finished two books to-day, so I made my goal of reading sixty books before this familial party at the end of the month.

Except that yester-day it was cancelled because schedules don’t work out.

I’m kind of glad though because I still have absolutely no idea what I’m doing with my life, and I don’t think I’d be very good at disguising my terror.  Also there was going to be weird food, and I am by no means a culinary adventurer.

Photo
pleatedjeans:

ah yes, the majestic Word Bank.

pleatedjeans:

ah yes, the majestic Word Bank.

(via liamdryden)

Link

I started a blog where I talk about movies and television shows.  This is the first (and so far only) post; it’s about flowers in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

(Source: illuminatedcelluloid.blogspot.com)

Link

I wrote a quote-heavy post about alliteration in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and how it points to Anglo Saxon influence.

(Source: gleaming-arch.blogspot.com)

Text

Super cool word I found while I was looking up tenon (“a projecting member in a piece of wood or other material for insertion into a mortise to make a joint”) - rubefacient (“causing redness”).  I prefer this over Shakespeare’s incarnadine (I’m re-reading Macbeth, although I haven’t gotten to that part yet).

Finding cool words by mistake: one of the advantages of a physical dictionary.

Video

scishow:

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!!!

The Real Doctor Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is widely regarded as the first work of science fiction. You all know the story, right? Scientist reanimates dead creature. Creature scares the living daylights out of society in general. Creature smash. A classic tale.

But, where’d she get the idea? Were there real-life Dr. Frankensteins in Mary Shelley’s time? Can we find parallels today? That’s what we’ll examine in this week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart. Of course you’ll have to watch to find out :)

But wait! That’s not all! What does Frankenstein really MEAN? What does it teach us, if anything about science and its impact on life? Is it a tale of science gone too far? Or is it something deeper, a tale about a different kind of monster? Unfortunately, most of the movie adaptations have been, shall we say, “less-than-true to the book” in this regard. But I’ve got your back. Let me know if you agree with my take on the story!

It’s science-meets-history-meets-literature this week on OKTBS, and it comes to life as soon as you hit the play button.

PS - Have you watched Frankenstein, MD from PBS Digital Studios and Pemberley Digital yet? You know, the modern retelling of Shelley’s classic story featuring young medical researcher Victoria Frankenstein and her assistant Iggy? What are you waiting for?!

Science! History! Literature! All the good stuff!

Text

molotowcocktease:

marcoereus:

I’m so tired of people telling me German is an “ugly, angry” language. When my German teacher tells us jokes it’s the sweetest, happiest language in the world. When I teach my father the word for daughter he smiles, repeating “Tochter” to himself until he gets it right, and in that moment German sounds like pride. There’s nothing angry or ugly about a language that never says goodbye, only “until we meet again.”

Thank you for this

(via fizzylimon)