Photo
z0mbiearms:

This makes no sense but I’m laughing so hard.

z0mbiearms:

This makes no sense but I’m laughing so hard.

(Source: tldrwikipedia)

Text

A few weeks ago, I started reading Isaac Asimov’s Please Explain.  My copy is from 1973, and I got it from my grandpa’s basement five or six years ago.

I recently found a piece of paper in it that contains the telephone numbers for two tree servicers.  On the back is a reminder for a haircut on Saturday at 12:45.

This is why I love used books.

Text

It’s back!

Link

I wrote a rather lengthy post about an Othello quote in Jack London’s The Sea Wolf.

(Source: gleaming-arch.blogspot.com)

Photo
nprbooks:


Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.
If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

nprbooks:

Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.

If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

Text

At the beginning of last year, I started a blog where I just list all of the music that I listen to everyday.  In May 2012, this was a thing that NPR suggested doing for a week, and then I just kept doing it once the new year rolled around.  Now that I’ve been doing it a whole year, it’s interesting to go back and see what I listened to exactly a year ago.  I’ve also noted the first time I’ve listened to certain things, so you can figure out exactly how many times I’ve listened to certain albums.

I was going to update this early this morning because I had listened to a few things and couldn’t get to sleep yet.  And I found that Google had deleted it because they thought it was spam.  So I went through the reclamation process, and it has to be reviewed by a real person before I can get it back.

I don’t know exactly what my feelings about that are, but they’re not good ones.

Photo
colchrishadfield:

Salut Montréal! Je vais visiter le Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan lundi soir pour signer mon livre - version française.

J’ai vu ce livre aujourd’hui, et je l’ai achèté.
I don’t know if that’s right; it’s been four years since I’ve done passé composé.  I saw this book to-day, and I bought it.  In English though.

colchrishadfield:

Salut Montréal! Je vais visiter le Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan lundi soir pour signer mon livre - version française.

J’ai vu ce livre aujourd’hui, et je l’ai achèté.

I don’t know if that’s right; it’s been four years since I’ve done passé composé.  I saw this book to-day, and I bought it.  In English though.

Text

dreamybean:

starfleetinginterest:

what if the coins you find randomly at the bottom of drawers and in between couch cushions are actually from spiders trying to pay rent

image

(via z0mbiearms)

Photo
ask-the-multishipper:



I remember reading this and then liking it - in the social media sense, but also in the normal sense, especially after seeing this post.

ask-the-multishipper:

I remember reading this and then liking it - in the social media sense, but also in the normal sense, especially after seeing this post.

(via liamdryden)

Chat
  • Louis: [just regaining consciousness after the battle with Gozer] Who are you guys?
  • Dr Ray Stantz: We're the Ghostbusters.
  • Louis: Who does your taxes?
Text

januaryscloak:

At the beginning of the year, I had this vague idea about recording a folk song every month, like Roger McGuinn does with his Folk Den.  To some degree, I have been doing that (it’s just that they’ve not all been folk songs [they have all been covers though]), but I’m going to start organizing it better.

I say this mostly because to-day I recorded the song for this month (it is a folk song), and I did some stuff with arranging vocal parts, and I think it turned out really well.  I’m not going to be posting it until the 30th though.  McGuinn uploads his on the first day of every month, so I think I’m going to go with the last day of each month.

As a reminder, I’m using only acoustic instruments for the first half of this year, and in July, I’ll be adding only my electric twelve-string (also because of McGuinn).  These covers are exempt from that constraint, although so far, they have all been just acoustic.

Here’re the other songs I’ve done this year:

I think I hinted at this a few weeks or a month ago.  Now I’m actually going to try to continue doing it.

Photo
I just really like Duolingo.

I just really like Duolingo.

Text

I just read a thing about dialects, and now I can’t stop thinking about how people where I live say things like “I seen” and write “could of.”

Also, while it’s not linked to that, I also think about how people park their cars in their backyards and leave their garage doors open all the time.

I don’t like where I live.

Photo
This was one of the sentences from Duolingo to-day, and I’m probably thinking about it too much.
Last month, I started a book every other day, and I ended up reading ten books completely within the month.  But that’s a really poor sample size (because it’s a sample size of one), and I was doing things other than reading.  And not just normal other things like sleeping; things like going to school and doing homework and stuff - things I don’t have to do to continue living.
Additionally, I held pretty strictly to one chapter a day in each book, which - if I had disregarded - would have caused me to finish some books sooner.
So now I’m curious as to how many books I could read in a month if I didn’t have school stuff and other projects to worry about, and if I focused on reading as much as I could rather than a more leisurely (but still intensive) pace.
EDIT:  There’s also the variable of book length.  And perhaps even level of diction.  It doesn’t take as long to read a short book or a book with simple words.

This was one of the sentences from Duolingo to-day, and I’m probably thinking about it too much.

Last month, I started a book every other day, and I ended up reading ten books completely within the month.  But that’s a really poor sample size (because it’s a sample size of one), and I was doing things other than reading.  And not just normal other things like sleeping; things like going to school and doing homework and stuff - things I don’t have to do to continue living.

Additionally, I held pretty strictly to one chapter a day in each book, which - if I had disregarded - would have caused me to finish some books sooner.

So now I’m curious as to how many books I could read in a month if I didn’t have school stuff and other projects to worry about, and if I focused on reading as much as I could rather than a more leisurely (but still intensive) pace.

EDIT:  There’s also the variable of book length.  And perhaps even level of diction.  It doesn’t take as long to read a short book or a book with simple words.